Diet is Strongly Associated with the Risk of Depression

A team of researchers from England and France found that dietary patterns over a five-year period had a significant effect on the risk of feeling depressed.  People eating a predominantly natural-foods diet of mostly vegetables, fruits, fish, and whole grains were one-fourth less likely to have depression.  Those eating mainly processed foods, including processed meats, refined grains, fried foods, high-fat dairy products, and sweetened desserts were more than 50 percent more likely to feel depressed.  The natural-foods diet is richer in vitamins, minerals, and good fats that help maintain healthy moods.  (Akbaraly TN, Brunner EJ, Ferrie JE, et al.  Dietary pattern and depressive symptoms in middle age.  British Journal of Psychiatry, 2009;195:408-413)

Increased Blood Clot Risk with Antipsychotic Drugs

Scientists in the UK believe that antipsychotic drugs raise the risks of dangerous blood clots

This risk had already been spotted by some scientists and seems now to be confirmed by a new study. Almost 16,000 people suffered a deep vein thrombosis (formation of a blood clot in a deep vein) and 9,000 people suffered a clot in the lung.

Study subjects taking newer “atypical” antipsychotics had a 73% higher chance of developing a clot, reports BBC News.

Other studies have already revealed a higher stroke risk among patients taking antipsychotics.

For more information on psychiatric drugs, visit CCHR’s Psychiatric Drug Side Effects search engine.